Failure is a bruise, not a tattoo !

Success is catastrophic, it boosts your ego. Failure is the one that keeps you going.
In fact, the greatest people to have ever lived; have attained their success just one step beyond their greatest failure. Failures are not to be buried, in fact one must seek inspiration from them. And that’s exactly what Virat Kohli has done post his worst ever tour to England.

Brash, arrogant, upfront, cocky, bewildered – these were some of the attributes linked to Virat Kohli before his 2014 English tour. His aggression on the field and readiness to confront made him the man to watch out in particular in that series.To the contrary, there wasn’t anything worth remembering which he did on that tour.Actually, you could say it was dismal and was the leanest patch in his career.

He wasn’t reading the ball at all and had severe technical glitches in his game. Someone who could whip the ball outside the off-stump towards mid-wicket, was struggling with his off- stump. He was perishing to the swing and had no clue where his off-stump lay. He was completely taken off- guard with the English tactics and the fourth stump line stumped him mentally.

This was an excruciating phase he was keen on performing in the English conditions, a place which offers bowlers and batters a competitive platform to test their skills mentally and physically. Virat had failed miserably and not only did it hurt him immensely but his fans too.

Virat’s body language on that tour lacked lustre. He looked uncertain and his scores in ten innings read dismaying 1,8,25,0,39,28,0,7,6 and 20. He, alongside his fanatics were brought down to earth firmly and the King’s reputation was dented badly. The much anticipated and talked about The Virat Kohli had failed where it had really mattered for him to excel. He had fluttered on the English soils, which are supposed to be the litmus test for any player to be acclaimed amongst the greats and Virat had lost that chance.

He struggled to decide which ball to play and which one to leave. The positivity, confidence and assertiveness was lacking in his demeanour. It was a timid posture that he presented, unsure of his technique and quitting against the building hype and pressure.

Even I, as fan; could not fathom the sudden slump in his form and luck. It was a shocker. Whatever he did on that tour, was a bigger blunder than the former. All I can say is that it was a phase that needed to be forgotten by him and his fans and yes,the boss did overcome that feat in his own style.

Post the tour, he worked on his shortcomings – fitness,regime, focus and most importantly the sheer inability to not put a price on his wicket. 

He fought his way back to bury the dead and created new milestones game after game. He made four gritty tons in Australia post that tour and did bring significant accolades after taking over the captaincy from Mahendra Singh Dhoni. With maturity and hardwork in his first ever Test series as a skipper, he became the fourth Indian to score a hundred on captaincy debut after Sunil Gavaskar, Dilip Vengsarkar and Vijay Hazare as he hammered the Kangaroos at Adelaide.

By making another century in the second innings of the same match, he also became the only second player in Test chronicles to score hundreds in both innings of a Test on captaincy debut after Greg Chappell.

After that, there was no looking back.

In his next assignment in Sri Lanka, King Kohli showed his magical touch and flamboyance not only in his batting but leadership too. He became the first Indian captain to win an away series, after losing the first Test. With the achievement, he also became the youngest Indian captain to have won a Test series outside India.

Virat maintained the same consistency in his game from that tour to beating South Africa 3-0 and white-washing the kiwis at home. There’s nothing stopping this beast now.

Well, I am so glad that the failure occurred early in his career and it did prove a blessing in disguise.

Virat now looks to be on a different note all together. He is in the form of his life, creating symphonies in every match. He is much more focused and has dealt with temperamental issues in a way, you cannot even imagine. He is a wolf-pack who believes in marshalling his troops from the front. He kills aggression with his bat,not with words and is the perfect role model team India needs.

He has evolved from being a brat to becoming the ambassador of the game. He is an inspiration for billions. The best part – he has become a lot more patient, respectful of the opposition and has learnt it the hard way as how to wait for the ball. He is not committing to play the early ball anymore and that has happened due to better coordination in his footwork, balance and head positioning.

Also, he has minimised playing any sweeps and cuts, the shots which he wasn’t even trained on purpose from his childhood days. In an age defined by flashy stroke plays, he is sticking to his grit and core values. He fancies playing the flicks, cover drives and loves being conventional without playing the ball in the air.

Honestly, I have never seen a player as dedicated as Virat. After his failure, not only did he work on his mental fitness but physical agility too. He was won so many games for India just by his running abilities. Can you believe that ? He runs with the same intensity in Whites as he does in Blues.

Virat is too good a player to repeat the mistakes. He doesn’t go after the bowler’s reputation now and believes in living every ball. He understands the context of the game really well and realises how crucial his wicket is to the opposition. The very fact that he knows the bounty on his wicket, yet never allows the pressure to surmount on his head, makes him as the world’s best modern day batsman.

If Virat can overcome his failures, so could you! Let’s treat him as an example to help us outgrow ourselves. Stay Kohlified !

References – Driven.

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